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The Transfiguration of Man
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Transfiguration of Man, The
Transfiguration of Man, The
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Author(s): 
Subjects(s): 
Comparative Religion
Metaphysics

Price:  $12.00

ISBN:  0-941532-19-4
Book Size:  5 1/2" x 8 1/4"
# of Pages:  125
Language:  English



Description

The image of humanity presented by modern psychology is not only fragmentary but misleading. In reality, to be human means to be as if suspended between animality and divinity, but modern thought—whether philosophical or scientific—admits only of animality, practically speaking. Traditional wisdom corrects and perfects the image of man by insisting on his divinity, not by making a god of him but rather by taking account of his true nature, which surpasses the terrestrial and without which there would be no reason for his existence. It is this that can be called—symbolically speaking—the transfiguration of man.

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Detailed Description of The Transfiguration of Man

The image of humanity presented by modern psychology is not only fragmentary but misleading. In reality, to be human means to be as if suspended between animality and divinity, but modern thought—whether philosophical or scientific—admits only of animality, practically speaking. Traditional wisdom corrects and perfects the image of man by insisting on his divinity, not by making a god of him but rather by taking account of his true nature, which surpasses the terrestrial and without which there would be no reason for his existence. It is this that can be called—symbolically speaking—the transfiguration of man.


About the Author(s)

Frithjof Schuon

Frithjof Schuon (1907-1998) is best known as the foremost spokesman of the “Traditionalist” or “Perennialist” school and as a philosopher in the metaphysical current of Shankara and Plato. He wrote more than two dozen books on metaphysical, spiritual, artistic, and ethnic themes and was a regular contributor to journals on comparative religion in both Europe and America. Schuon’s writings have been consistently featured and reviewed in a wide range of scholarly and philosophical publications around the world, respected by both scholars and spiritual authorities. Besides his prose writings, Schuon was also a prolific poet (see a listing of Schuon's poetry books) and a gifted painter of images that always portrayed the beauty and power of the divine, and the nobility and virtue of primordial humanity.

World Wisdom features a series titled "The Writings of Frithjof Schuon", which includes many new editions of classic books by Schuon in new translations and with additional materials. Our online Library contains many articles and poems written by Frithjof Schuon, allowing readers to see a representative sample of his remarkable body of work.

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Reviews of The Transfiguration of Man

"Schuon’s genius lies in recalling the essential nature of things and thus the basic facts that define our existence and the elements of our happiness. The excesses to which human nature falls prey are masterfully and rigorously outlined, while never losing sight of the fact that man bears within his very substance saving truth, prayer and virtue. Above all, there is here the sense of the Absolute, the vertical dimension that gives meaning to life and without which there can be neither the grandeur, the mystery nor the love by which the soul lives.”
Banyen Books and Sound


Table of Contents for The Transfiguration of Man

CONTENTS
    Foreword
    Part One: Thought, Art and Work
  • Thought: Light and Perversion
  • Reflections on Ideological Sentimentalism
  • Usurpations of Religious Feeling
  • The Impossible Convergence
  • Art, Its Duties and Its Rights
  • The Spiritual Meaning of Work

    Part Two: Man, Truth and the Path
  • Faculties and Modalities of Man
  • Axioms of the Sophia Perennis
  • The Mystery of Possibility
  • The Ternary Rhythm of the Spirit
  • An Enigma of the Gospel
  • Characteristics of Voluntaristic Mysticism
  • Concerning the Principle of Sacrifice
  • Dimensions of Prayer

    Part Three: Excerpts from Correspondence
  • The Garden
  • The Ordeal
  • Certitudes
  • On Holiness
  • Love of God
  • Gratitude
  • Weakness and Strength
  • Complementarities
  • To Earn One's Salvation
  • The Sense of the Sacred
  • On Virtue
  • Treasures
  • The Ransom of the Self
  • Two Visions of Things
  • Manifestation and Proof
  • Sufic Onomatology
  • Existence and Divine Presence
  • The Two Great Moments


Excerpts from The Transfiguration of Man

Foreword

The image of man presented to us by modern psychology is not only fragmentary, it is pitiable. In reality, man is as if suspended between animality and divinity; now modern thought--be it philosophical or scientific--admits only animality,practically speaking.

We wish, on the contrary, to correct and perfect the image of man by insisting on his divinity; not that we wish to make a god of man, quod absit; we intend simply to take account of his true nature, which transcends the earthly, and lackingwhich he would have no reason for being.

It is this that we believe we can call--in a symbolist language--the "transfiguration of man."


The Garden
An Excerpt from The Transfiguration of Man

A man sees a beautiful garden, but he knows: he will not always see these flowers and bushes, because one day he will die; and he also knows: the garden will not always be there, because this world will disappear in its turn. And he knows also: this relationship with the beautiful garden is the gift of destiny, because if a man were to find himself in the middle of a desert, he would not see the garden; he sees it only because destiny has put him, man, here and not elsewhere.

But in the innermost region of our soul dwells the Spirit, and in it is contained the garden, as it were, like a seed; and if we love this garden--and how could we not love it since it is of a heavenly beauty?--we would do well to look for it where it has always been and always will be, that is to say in the Spirit; maintain yourself in the Spirit, in your own center, and you will have the garden and in addition all possible gardens. Similarly: in the Spirit there is no death, because here you are immortal; and in the Spirit the relationship between the contemplator and the contemplated is not only a fragile possibility; on the contrary, it is part of the very nature of the Spirit and, like it, it is eternal.

The Spirit is Consciousness and Will: Consciousness of oneself and Will towards oneself. Maintain yourself in the Spirit through Consciousness, and approach the Spirit through the Will or through Love; then neither death nor the end of the world can take away the garden from you nor destroy your vision. Whatever you are in the Spirit now, you will remain so after death; and whatever is yours in the Spirit now, will be yours after death. Before God there is neither being nor ownership except in the Spirit; whatever was outward must become inward and whatever was inward will become outward: look for the garden within yourself, in your indestructible divine Substance, which then will give you a new and imperishable garden.


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