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Ernest Thompson Seton explains "The Gospel of the Redman"
Where to look to "see God Everywhere"?
Interview with Frithjof Schuon - on Spirituality
Spiritual Masters - East & West Series
Insights into the early Christian Desert Fathers and Mothers
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Science and the Myth of Progress
William C. Chittick explores "The Sufi Doctrine of Rumi"
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slide 9 of 10

Charles Eastman and his wife separated in August 1921, quite possibly because of opposing views regarding the best future for the American Indian. Elaine Goodale Eastman stressed total assimilation of Native Americans into the dominant society, while Eastman favored a type of cultural pluralism in which Indians would interact with the dominant society, utilizing only those positive aspects that would benefit them but still retaining their Indian identity, including their traditional beliefs and customs—in effect living between two worlds.

Eastman believed that the teachings and spirit of his adopted religion of Christianity and the traditional Indian spiritual beliefs were essentially the same and had their common origins in the same “Great Mystery;” a belief that was controversial to many Christians.

In 1928 Eastman purchased land on the north shore of Lake Huron, near Desbarats, Ontario, Canada. For the remainder of his life, when he was not traveling and lecturing, he lived there in his primitive cabin in communion with the virgin nature that he loved so dearly.
Eastman with guide and bark canoe on Rainy Lake, Ontario
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