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Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days
Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days — details, sample pages, more
Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days
Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days
Click cover for larger image.
Author(s): 
Subjects(s): 
American Indian
Children’s Books

Price:  $15.95

ISBN:  978-1-937786-09-0
Book Size:  9.25" × 11"
# of Pages:  40
Language:  English



Description
What was it like to grow up in the world of the pre-reservation Plains Indians before the coming of the white man? Prior to our modern era of television, video games, and computers how did American Indian children live, learn, and play? In this beautifully illustrated book, award-winning author, Michael Oren Fitzgerald, combines stunning photographs and simple quotations by Indian chiefs and elders to explain to today’s youth what life would have been like growing up on the American plains.

Children of the Tipi is designed for 2nd- to 3rd-grade readers to read on their own, and can be read to children as young as four. Children of the Tipi includes sections on boys and girls at play, camp life, and the important role of parents and grandparents. It features historical sepia photographs of children at work and play, as well as detailed color photographs of their toys, tools, and everyday objects.

AWARDS

  • Winner of the 2013 Midwest Book Award Gold Medal in the category “Interior Layout”
  • Winner of the 2013 Midwest Book Award Silver Medal in the category “Children’s Non-Fiction”
  • Winner of the 2013 Midwest Book Award Silver Medal in the category “Total Book Design”
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“Children of the Tipi”, details

What was it like to grow up in the world of the pre-reservation Plains Indians before the coming of the white man? Prior to our modern era of television, video games, and computers how did American Indian children live, learn, and play? In this beautifully illustrated book, award-winning author, Michael Oren Fitzgerald, combines stunning photographs and simple quotations by Indian chiefs and elders to explain to today’s youth what life would have been like growing up on the American plains.

Children of the Tipi is designed for 2nd- to 3rd-grade readers to read on their own, and can be read to children as young as four. The book includes sections on boys and girls at play, camp life, and the important role of parents and grandparents. It features historical sepia photographs of children at work and play, as well as detailed color photographs of their toys, tools, and everyday objects.

More information and resources for classroom use or fun activities can be found on the Wisdom Tales Press web site on the book page for Children of the Tipi..

AWARDS

  • Winner of the 2013 Midwest Book Award Gold Medal in the category “Interior Layout”
  • Winner of the 2013 Midwest Book Award Silver Medal in the category “Children’s Non-Fiction”
  • Winner of the 2013 Midwest Book Award Silver Medal in the category “Total Book Design”


The editor of “Children of the Tipi”

Michael Fitzgerald

Michael Fitzgerald is an author, editor, and publisher of books on world religions, sacred art, tradition, culture, and philosophy. He has written and edited many publications on American Indian spirituality, including Yellowtail: Crow Medicine Man and Sun Dance Chief, and was adopted into Yellowtail's tribe and family. Fitzgerald has also taught university classes on religious traditions of North American Indians and lectured widely. His contributions to World Wisdom books and DVDs include:

Edited/Authored   Co-edited (with Judith Fitzgerald):   DVD projects:
   

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Reviews of “Children of the Tipi”

Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days is a signature edition of collected quotations and sayings of North American Plains members of different tribes plus a stunning array of historic, rare sepia and [black-and-]white photographs of Native Americans of the Plains taken before 1904. Michael Oren has edited some of the proverbs and quotations, but the impact of the wisdom is unmitigated. Here are pictures of herds of buffalo, mothers and children in beaded cradleboards, Indian boys and girls at play with com husk dolls and bows and arrows, and whole tribes riding horses pulling travois laden with buffalo hide tens and camp supplies. Here also are photos of bowls, spoons, corn, meat drying racks, pottery, jewelry, and rugs, and their making. All pictures are further explained in quotations of words from documented Native American individuals, with much guidance and valuable life messages contained in each utterance. The last few pages show modem color photos of Native American children of today, some still in special tribal dress. Michael Oren Fitzgerald has taught Religious Traditions of the North American Indians at Indiana University and is an adopted son of the late Thomas Yellowtail, an esteemed American Indian spiritual leader of the previous century. Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days is a fascinating window into the past of North America's many Plains Native American tribes, sure to be enjoyed by children ages 4-8 and their parents, caretakers, and educators.”
Children's Bookwatch, a review publication of Midwest Book Review



Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days, edited by Michael Oren Fitzgerald will tell you how The People lived, worked, played, hunted, told stories, and shared with one another. Maybe the sacred days of long ago are gone. Maybe not. Maybe they live on in beautiful books like this one where the days stretch endlessly before us and people of wisdom speak knowingly of the world they inhabit. Wisdom shines forth like this: ‘Women have power: Children. Can any warrior make a child, no matter how brave and wonderful he is?’ (Maria Chona, Papago, p. 4).

“Yes, ‘Life is so different now,’ as Belle Highwalking (northern Cheyenne, p.17) tells us. ‘There are even some people today that always lived in town. They will never know what it was like to live in the country.’

“This lovely book full of fine photographs of the old days reminds us that the old ways were good because they were not always easy: ‘ … People were tough in those days,’ says Pretty Shield (Absaroke, p. 16). But they prayed that goodness would follow them all the days of their lives: ‘We prayed that we might be beautiful in body, face, and heart. This protected us from evil. Then we had strength to meet the day and its problems’ (Polingaysi Qoyawayma, Hopi, p. 19).

“To read a book that is full of wisdom is a privilege, and thanks to Michael Oren Fitzgerald, we can do that. To take the spirit of such a book and breathe it in, slowly and with reverence, is food for the mind that will cleanse the heart. That way the good days are still with us.”
Gerald Hausman, storyteller, educator, and author or co-author of more than 70 books such as The American Storybag, Time Swimmer, Turtle Dream: Collected Stories from the Hopi, Navajo, Pueblo, and Havasupai People, Three Little Birds, and The Jacob Ladder



“This gem showcases the traditional life of the Plains Indians who ‘resist[ed] the white encroachment’ the longest. Although the tribes included had varied cultures, Fitzgerald focuses on two common themes: moral character and the ‘sacred quality of virgin Nature.’ Categorized under headings such as ‘Mothers,’ ‘Girls at Play,’ ‘Boys Love Bows and Arrows,’ ‘Daily Camp Life,’ ‘Music and Dance,’ ‘Living in Nature,’ and ‘The Olden Days Have Vanished,’ each section is generously illustrated with sepia-toned archival photos. Quotes from important members of the tribes, people who had experienced firsthand or learned the traditional ways from elders, make up most of the text… The images are carefully positioned, and spot color photos of cultural artifacts add detail to each topic. The concluding pages, ‘…But Many Traditions Live On,’ switch to color pictures of modern children participating in traditional activities. For the art alone, this will be a useful addition.”
School Library Journal, from a review by Carol S. Surges



Children of the Tipi is a treasure. The book shares both images and words that accomplish so well what Michael Fitzgerald describes in his Editor's Note: that we can ‘learn the wisdom of the olden-day Indians directly from the source … we can still glimpse the spirit of that irreplaceable world directly through their words and photographs.’ In this book we have this unique opportunity to listen and look. I greatly appreciate Fitzgerald’s goal to ‘show not tell’ about Native wisdom, ‘including the emphasis they placed on moral character and the sacred quality of virgin Nature.’

“During the past several years as I have written and spoken about the need for children's books about and by Native Americans, I have emphasized the need to show individuals, not stereotypes, and historical accuracy, not myths, exaggerations, or misrepresentations — or silent omissions. We need books written from the Native perspective.… [Children of the Tipi ] brings the reader full-circle to now, contemporary times, with photographs of today's Native children continuing the very traditions described in earlier pages.

“Michael Fitzgerald has created [a book] that is accessible and understandable to young readers.”
Nancy Bo Flood, counselor, educator, and author of such books as The Navaho Year, Cowboy Up!: Ride the Navajo Rodeo, and The Hogan That Great-Grandfather Built


Sample Pages from “Children of the Tipi”

From the web site of our children's book imprint, Wisdom Tales, we have two links below that show how the book looks in detail. Click on one of the links below to open a pdf of the page spreads to see samples of the text and illustrations in Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days. The text and illustrations were selected by award-winning author and editor Michael O. Fitzgerald. Note: If your browser displays pdf files itself, rather than opening pdf files in Adobe Reader, you may see the pages one above the other, rather than as a “spread,” which is how they would look when the book is opened and showing two pages side-by-side. To see a more accurate view of the pages, right-click on a link and select “Save Target As” or “Save link as” and save the pdf file to your computer; you can then open it with Adobe Reader.



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