Sign In . Don't have a World Wisdom ID? Sign Up

   Limit Search to: Advanced Search





Studies in Comparative Religion - 1967
This site includes Studies in Comparative Religion - 1967’s pictures, online articles, reviews, table of contents, and more.
Studies in Comparative Religion - Commemorative Annual Edition 1967
Studies in Comparative Religion - Commemorative Annual Edition 1967
Click cover for larger image.
Author(s): 
Subjects(s): 
Comparative Religion

Price:  $23.95

ISBN:  978-1-933316-54-3
Book Size:  8.25x11
# of Pages:  160
Language:  English



Description
Studies in Comparative Religion was founded in Britain in 1963 by Francis Clive-Ross (1921–1981) and is the first and most comprehensive English-language journal of traditional studies. The journal was published under the name Tomorrow until 1967, when it was changed to its present name. Four quarterly issues per year, containing over 1,200 articles in total, were published during the first 25 years of Studies in Comparative Religion’s existence, before its publication was interrupted in 1987.

Each Commemorative Annual Edition contains all of the articles, editorials, and letters to the editor in the exact manner as the four quarterly issues that were published in the respective years.
More Information


Detailed Description
About the Author
Read Reviews
Table of Contents
Selections from our Library
Quantity:  



You may also be interested in




Page: 1 of 19

Detailed Description of Studies in Comparative Religion - 1967

Studies in Comparative Religion was founded in Britain in 1963 by Francis Clive-Ross (1921–1981) and is the first and most comprehensive English-language journal of traditional studies. The journal was published under the name Tomorrow until 1967, when it was changed to its present name. Four quarterly issues per year, containing over 1,200 articles in total, were published during the first 25 years of Studies in Comparative Religion’s existence, before its publication was interrupted in 1987.

Each Commemorative Annual Edition contains all of the articles, editorials, and letters to the editor in the exact manner as the four quarterly issues that were published in the respective years.

Visit www.studiesincomparativereligion.com for a full on-line archive of all articles found in the journal.


About the Author(s)

Francis Clive-Ross

F. Clive-Ross was the founder, publisher and editor of the journal Studies in Comparative Religion and its predecessor Tomorrow. For nearly 20 years under Clive-Ross’ guidance, Studies was one of the predominant platforms for discussion of all issues to pertaining to comparative religious studies. Clive-Ross also founded the publishing house, Perennial Books Ltd, and was a trustee of the “World of Islam Festival”. He died in 1981.

World Wisdom has proudly sponsored a new beginning for Studies. All of the original issues are being placed on a custom website: www.studiesincomparativereligion.com. Mr. Clive-Ross's editorials appear in the compilations of Studies in Comparative Religion issues published by World Wisdom:


Click here for more information



Reviews of Studies in Comparative Religion - 1967

“One of the most interesting intellectual developments of the 1960s was the publication in England of a periodical called Studies in Comparative Religion. When it first came across my desk, it had seemed to me merely another gray scholarly journal—an impression that was only strengthened by its stated pur pose of presenting essays concerning ‘traditional studies.’ Like many Americans, I was put off by the very word ‘tradition.’ But I pressed on because I had heard that this journal contained some of the most serious thinking of the twentieth century.
“And in fact I quickly saw that its contributors were not interested in the hypothesizing and the marshaling of piecemeal evidence that characterizes the work of most academicians. On close reading, I felt an extraordinary intellectual force radiating through their intricate prose. These men were out for the kill. For them, the study of spiritual traditions was a sword with which to destroy the illusions of contemporary man….
“All I could have said defi nitely was that they seemed to take metaphysical ideas more seriously than one might have thought possible. It was as though for them such ideas were the most real things in the world. They conformed their thought to these ideas in the way the rest of us tend to conform our thought to material things. Perhaps it was this aspect that gave their essays a fl avor that was both slightly archaic and astonishingly fresh at the same time....
“That these writings bring something that has been entirely lacking in Western religious thought is therefore not open to question. But that is not the court at which their work deserves to be judged, nor would they wish it so. Something much more serious is at stake than merely renewing the comparative study of religion throughout the land….”
Jacob Needleman, San Francisco State College, Editor for The Penguin Metaphysical Library


Table of Contents for Studies in Comparative Religion - 1967

Vol.1, #1, Winter 1967


EDITORIAL by F. Clive-Ross   1

Keys to the Bible by Frithjof Schuon   2

On Meditation by Dom Aelred Graham, O.S.B.   5

Extracts from the Letters of  Shaikh Al-`Arabī Ad-Darqāwī    10

Translated by Titus Burckhardt

Introduction to Tibetan Art by Marco Pallis   17

The Wild Boar and the Bear by René Guénon   i 27

Book Reviews    32

Correspondence    37


Vol.1, #2, Spring 1967


Nature and Function of the Spiritual Master by Frithjof Schuon    41

Orthodoxy and the Master texts presented by Whitall N. Perry   48

Meditation and Action by The Venerable Chögyam Trungpa   56

Hermes by René Guénon    63

Reincarnation: New Flesh on Old Bones by Whitall N. Perry    67

Correspondence    75

Vol.1, #3, Summer 1967


The Sword of the Spirit: The Making of an Orthodox Rosary by D. M. Deed     79

Traditional Symbolism in Kubla Khan by Kathleen Raine   85

The Science of Hand-Reading in Sufism by René Guénon   96

“With God all things are possible” by Lord Northbourne   99

Perennial Values in Islamic Art by Titus Burckhardt   105

Correspondence    112


Vol.1, #4, Autumn 1967


EDITIORIAL by Clive F. Ross   117

The Impossible Convergence by Frithjof Schuon   118

The Image and its Meaning in Popular Hindu Ritual by Ursula M. Sharma     121

A Thomist Approach to the Vedanta by Bernard Kelly   131

Pilgrimage to Mecca by Abu Bakr Siraj ad-Din   136

A Zen Master by Irmgard Schlögel   143

Book Reviews    145

Correspondence    150


Selection from our Library about Studies in Comparative Religion - 1967
 TitleSourceAuthor 1Author 2Subject WW HTMLWW PDFExternal Link
Noted traditionalist author Marco Pallis responds to a previous issue's correspondence on reincarnation. He begins with an objective look at Guénon's tendency to use a harsh tone when attacking modern tendencies, but also charmingly notes this necessary mission requires "special qualities, in the man, such as rarely go with delicately adjusted expression." Pallis makes some very interesting points in his response to Mr. Calmeyer's correspondence, summarized in the phrase that "human birth is a rare and correspondingly precious opportunity." Pallis suggests several corrections to Guénon's conclusions on reincarnation, and offers some thought-provoking insights on the subject in general.
Correspondence on reincarnationStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 1. ( Winter, 1967)Pallis, Marco Buddhism
Marco Pallis was one of the best informed Europeans on all aspects of traditional Tibetan life, and one of the most authoritative on its spiritual center, and thus its related expansion into the arts. This brief survey of a variety of traditional Tibetan arts proceeds from the perspective that the light of the Buddha's Doctrine reveals itself through the particular symbolism of the traditional arts. Pallis surveys Tibetan architecture, painting, the plastic arts (such as the art of modeling images of Buddhas and Saints, along with metal casting), woodwork, metalwork and weaving (including rug-making). His brief survey nonetheless gives fascinating insights that illustrate the basic point: "The supreme work of art, in Buddhist eyes, is Enlightenment itself; the human art of living, with all its component arts, is as a bow bent to speed an arrow to that target."
Introduction to Tibetan ArtStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 1. ( Winter, 1967)Pallis, Marco Art
The subject of Islamic art in various forms is the central topic of this article and the reader is given an in-depth analysis of the symbolism and meaning of this traditional art. The author’s goal is to approach the topic of this article without using the historical evidence of influence from other cultures as much as the historical background of how Islamic art reflects the original goals of that religion. Burckhardt also points out some of the problems of the approach that modern science takes towards Islamic art. The author also provides some intriguing comparisons between Islamic and Christian art and how the differences in form symbolically reflect differences in religious doctrine. Some of the specific subjects analyzed in this way include icons, or lack thereof, the architecture of mosques and basilicas, structural ornamentation and inscriptions within sacred structures.
Perennial Values in Islamic ArtStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 3. ( Summer, 1967)Burckhardt, Titus Art
In this article, Frithjof Schuon examines the issue of disharmony found in the world and in human life, and he makes the point that all the sufferings found in life cannot be eased by worldly things. Physical “progress” according to Schuon has no power to reconcile inward struggles, only spiritual sanctification can. This article also examines how the effects of evil cannot be eliminated without understanding the cause, or the evil itself. This subject is analyzed primarily within the context and terminology of Christianity. Using the concept of ‘sin’ and quotes such as “seek ye first the Kingdom of God”, Schuon delves into the topic of finding cessation from worldly troubles.
The Impossible ConvergenceStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 4. ( Autumn, 1967)Schuon, Frithjof Christianity
In this article Schuon discusses the role of the spiritual master by drawing from various religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. He uses these traditions to examine the role and authority of the spiritual master in regard to the disciple. The symbolism of the spiritual master is also discussed here using the Hindu terms of Being, Consciousness and Bliss. According to Schuon the master provides the disciple with a “spiritual existence” and a doctrine that he would not otherwise have. Schuon also makes the point that a spiritual master may not “unveil totally” or make completely clear the truth that he understands. Finally, the author points out that the term “spiritual master” is a broad one, and includes a range of people who are not necessarily equal to each other.
Nature and Function of the Spiritual MasterStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 2. ( Spring, 1967)Schuon, Frithjof Comparative Religion
Frithjof Schuon states that "in order to understand the nature of the Bible and its meaning, it is essential to have recourse to the ideas of both symbolism and revelation. Without an exact and, in the measure necessary, sufficiently profound understanding of these key ideas, the approach to the Bible remains hazardous and risks engendering grave doctrinal, psychological, and historical errors." So that the scripture might retain "all its vitality and all its liberating power," Schuon's essay explains the critical points of the Bible's use of symbolism and its sacred origin.
Keys to the BibleStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 1. ( Winter, 1967)Schuon, Frithjof Christianity
This is an article on www.studiesincomparativereligion.com in which René Guénon examines correspondences in ancient Hindu, Celtic, and Greek traditions in which the symbols of the wild boar and the bear appear.
The Wild Boar and the BearStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 1. ( Winter, 1967)Guénon, René Symbolism
This is an article on www.studiesincomparativereligion.com in which René Guénon turns to the figure of Hermes as a manifestation of the divine impulse to return human beings to their "primordial state." Guénon demonstrates how the figure of Hermes himself, or an equivalent, plays an important role in a number of traditions including Greek, ancient Egyptian, Norse, and Islamic.
HermesStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 2. ( Spring, 1967)Guénon, René Symbolism
This is an article on www.studiesincomparativereligion.com in which René Guénon examines the science of hand-reading found in Islamic societies. He states that the basis for this science is the correlation between the structure of the hand and the 99 Names of God, and examines other profound aspects of this correlation.
The Science of Hand-Reading in SufismStudies in Comparative Religion, Vol. 1, No. 3. ( Summer, 1967)Guénon, René Symbolism
 9 entries (Displaying results 1 - 9) View : Jump to: Page: of 1 pages
Loading...



Home | Books | DVDs | Authors | eProducts | Members | Slideshows | Library | Image-Gallery | Links | About Us | Sitemap





Privacy Statement
Copyright © 2008