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Sacred Art in East and West
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Sacred Art in East and West: Its Principles and Methods
Sacred Art in East and West: Its Principles and Methods
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Author(s): 
Subjects(s): 
Art
Buddhism
Christianity
Hinduism
Islam

Price:  $19.95

ISBN:  1-887752-41-2
Book Size:  6" x 9"
# of Pages:  160
Language:  English



Description
Contains 16 color illustrations and 25 line drawings

A work of such profound importance--defining the meaning and spiritual use of Sacred Art through its symbolic content and dependence on metaphysical principles--could only have come from a scholar of the callibre of Titus Burckhardt. Wide in scope, covering Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, Islamic, and Taoist art, this work—unlike other books in its field—can help readers accomplish in themselves the very goals for sacred art (i.e. spiritual transfiguration).

Every sacred art is deeply rooted in the religion from which it originates. This, however, does not imply that everything that could be called “religious art” is in fact sacred art (identifiable as such by its style and methods rather than by its models). Style and method are, above all, the vehicles of tradition, and tradition originates in the “revelation” which gave birth to each great civilization. (Also available in a hardcover edition.)

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About the Author
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Detailed Description of Sacred Art in East and West

(For the hardcover edition, click here.)

Contains 16 color illustrations and 25 line drawings

A work of such profound importance--defining the meaning and spiritual use of Sacred Art through its symbolic content and dependence on metaphysical principles--could only have come from a scholar of the callibre of Titus Burckhardt. Wide in scope, covering Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, Islamic, and Taoist art, this work—unlike other books in its field—can help readers accomplish in themselves the very goals for sacred art (i.e. spiritual transfiguration).

Every sacred art is deeply rooted in the religion from which it originates. This, however, does not imply that everything that could be called “religious art” is in fact sacred art (identifiable as such by its style and methods rather than by its models). Style and method are, above all, the vehicles of tradition, and tradition originates in the “revelation” which gave birth to each great civilization.



About the Author(s)

Titus Burckhardt

Titus Burckhardt (1908-1984) was one of the leading perennialist writers of the twentieth century. His writings showed remarkable scope. Burckhardt wrote on pure metaphysics, on tradition and modern science, on sacred art, on history and political science, and on various other aspects of traditional civilizations. Burckhardt was also a translator (from Arabic into French), an editor and publisher, and a respected consultant on restoring traditional cities to their former beautiful states. World Wisdom has published the following books by Burckhardt:

    

In addition, numerous Titus Burckhardt essays have appeared in various World Wisdom anthologies. Our free online Library has many essays and excerpts from Burckhardt's writings.


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Table of Contents for Sacred Art in East and West

CONTENTS
  • Introduction
  • I. The Genesis of the Hindu Temple
  • II. The Foundations of Christian Art
  • III. “I Am the Door”
  • IV. The Foundations of Islamic Art
  • V. The Image of Buddha
  • VI. Landscape in Far Eastern Art
  • VII. The Decadence and the Renewal of Christian Art


Excerpts from Sacred Art in East and West


In Islam, a mosque generally comprises a courtyard with a fountain where the faithful can make their ablutions before performing their prayers. The fountain is often protected by a small cupola in the form of a baldaquin. The courtyard with a fountain in the middle, as well as the enclosed garden watered by four streams of water gushing forth from its center, are made in the likeness of Paradise, for the Koran speaks of the gardens of Beatitude, where springs of water flow and where celestial virgins dwell. It is in the nature of Paradise (janna) to be hidden and secret; it corresponds to the inward world, the innermost soul. It is on this heavenly pattern that the Islamic house is modeled, with its inner courtyard surrounded by walls on all four sides, and with its enclosed garden containing a well or a fountain. The house is the sacratum (haram) of the family, where woman reigns and man is but a guest. The Islamic house is shut off from the outer world— the life of the family being withdrawn from the social life of the community—it is only open upwards towards the heavens, which are reflected in the fountain below.

The spiritual style of Islam is also manifested in the art of clothing, and especially in the masculine costume of the purely Muslim peoples. This could be said to be a priestly costume that has become generalized, just as Islam “generalized” the priesthood by abolishing hierarchy and making every believer a priest, so that any Muslim can perform for himself the essential rites of his religion. The masculine costume of Islam is a synthesis of sacerdotal and monastic attire, and as such affirms masculine dignity; and the turban, called the crown or diadem of Islam is, according to the Prophet, the mark of spiritual and sacerdotal stature.


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