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Interview with Frithjof Schuon - on Art
Treasures of the World's Religions
Spiritual Masters - East & West Series
The Universal Spirit of Islam: Keys for Interfaith Understanding
A Definition of the Perennial Philosophy
Interview with Frithjof Schuon - on Spirituality
What bridges exist between Christianity and Islam?
Who was Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa)?
William C. Chittick explores "The Sufi Doctrine of Rumi"
Paul Goble's World: Native Americans' relationship to all created beings
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  Who was Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa)? Back to the List of Slideshows
    
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Hakadah's father was named Many Lightnings (Tawakanhdeota). He was a full-blood Sioux, and later took the name Jacob Eastman.

Since Hakadah's mother had died, the baby was raised in the tribe's homeland of Minnesota by his grandmother. When he was four, the so-called "Sioux Uprising of 1862" occurred and he became separated from his father, elder brothers and sister, whom the tribe thought had been killed by the whites. Hakadah was taken into exile into Manitoba with the remaining members of his band of Santee Sioux.

For the next eleven years he lived the original nomadic life of his people in the care of his uncle and grandmother. His uncle was a well-known hunter and warrior and gave the youth, now called Ohiyesa, the traditional training of a young hunter, warrior, and member of the tribe. Ohiyesa's knowledge of these skills and spiritual values would later be reflected in his activities and his writings.

At fifteen, Ohiyesa had just entered Indian manhood and was preparing to embark on his first war-path to avenge the reputed death of his father when his father reappeared! Jacob Eastman had adopted the religion and customs of the whites and had come to take his son back with him.
Ohiyesa’s father,
Many Lightnings
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