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Prince of Wales


Life and Work of HRH Charles Windsor, The Prince of Wales
This site includes HRH Charles Prince of Wales’s biography, photos, online articles, bibliography, links, and more.
HRH Charles Prince of Wales
HRH Charles  Prince of Wales
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Biography of HRH Charles Prince of Wales

HRH Charles Prince of Wales is the heir apparent to the throne of the United Kingdom. He is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. The Prince was born at Buckingham Palace on November 14, 1948. His mother became queen on February 6, 1952. The Prince attended a series of elementary and secondary schools in Great Britain and Australia, and then entered Cambridge University in 1967 was awarded a degree in 1970. He was the first heir to the throne ever to take a degree.

The Queen invested her son as Prince of Wales in July, 1969. He took his seat in the House of Lords in February, 1970.

The Prince began a military career in 1971, receiving training as a pilot. He entered the navy, following in the footsteps of his father, grandfather and both his great-grandfathers. He served on a guided missile destroyer and two frigates. In 1974 Prince Charles qualified as a helicopter pilot and then joined a naval air squadron which operated from a carrier. In 1976, he took command of a coastal minehunter for his last nine months in the Navy.

The Prince of Wales was married to Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. The Prince and Princess of Wales had two sons: Prince William (b. 1982), the second in line to the throne, and Prince Harry (b. 1984), the third in line to the throne. The Prince and Princess of Wales separated in late 1992, and the marriage was dissolved in 1996. The Princess died in a car crash in 1997. In 2005 The Prince of Wales married Mrs Parker-Bowles, now The Duchess of Cornwall.

Prince Charles has a wide range of interests which are reflected in 'The Prince's Charities', a group of twenty not-for-profit organizations of which he is President. Eighteen of the twenty charities were founded personally by The Prince. This group of organizations is the largest multi-cause charitable enterprise in the United Kingdom, raising over £119 million annually. These charities represent a broad range of areas, such as: opportunity and enterprise, education, health, the built environment, responsible business, and the natural environment. The Prince has also become Patron or President of hundreds of similar organizations. He has presented many articles and speeches on architecture, the inner cities, rural communities, education, religion, interfaith tolerance, health, farming, and other areas reflecting his broad interests.

Of particular interest to Perennialists and Traditionalists, The Prince is actively interested in traditional thought and its applications to the problems of the modern world. He is the Patron of the Temenos Academy, which is dedicated to the central ideas of the Perennial Philosophy. The Temenos Academy Review is the journal of the Academy and is the successor to the journal Temenos, first published in 1981 and founded by Keith Critchlow, Brian Keeble, Kathleen Raine and Philip Sherrard. HRH The Prince of Wales wrote that the Academy and its review are “committed both to the perennial philosophy and to the notion that Man is, at root, a spiritual creature with spiritual and intellectual needs which have to be nourished if we are to fulfill our potential.”

Because of this interest in the Perennial Philosophy and Tradition, Prince Charles gave an opening videotaped address to the Sacred Web conference on “Tradition in the Modern World.” The Prince of Wales' videotaped address is given in full on Tradition in the Modern World: Sacred Web 2006 Conference, a two-disc DVD set.

He also contributed the “Foreword” to Shakespeare’s Sonnets and the Bible: A Spiritual Interpretation with Christian Sources, by Ira B. Zinman.

Books/DVDs containing the work of HRH Charles Prince of Wales

Contributions in World Wisdom books and DVDs from HRH Charles The Prince of Wales:


HRH Charles Prince of Wales’s Writings Online
 TitleSourceAuthor 1Author 2SubjectWW HTMLWW PDFExternal Link
This is a transcript of The Prince of Wales' videotaped introduction to the Sacred Web Conference, "Tradition in the Modern World," presented on September 23, 2006, at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Prince Charles begins his comments with: "In these uprooted times, there is a great need for constancy; a need for those who can rise above the clamour, the din and the sheer pace of our lives to help us to rediscover those truths that are immutable and eternal; a need for those who can speak of that eternal wisdom which is called the perennial philosophy." The address continues to outline key points of Traditionalism and the Perennial Philosophy, supporting The Prince's theme that there are real and positive applications of these points in "finding practical solutions to what, at first, seem to be impossible difficulties – and sometimes to speak for those whose voices are unheard amidst the clamour of Modernism." The Prince's insights demonstrate his thoughtful consideration of and interest in the worldview offered by the Perennial Philosophy.
The Introduction by The Prince of Wales to the 2006 Sacred Web ConferenceThe website of the journal "Sacred Web"Prince of Wales, HRH Charles Tradition, Modernism, Environment and Nature, Perennial Philosophy
This article by The Prince of Wales, dated January 2000, was originally published in "The Temenos Review." In it, The Prince outlines the reason for the establishment of his Foundation for the Built Environment and for his support for the Temenos Academy and journal. The Prince expresses his support for both because they "challenge the deadening Industrialisation of Life which carries no understanding of the timeless qualities which permeate a truly civilised and harmonious society." He sees great practical importance in fostering activities that go "beyond only rational intellect," and that fulfill humanity's need for "harmony and balance" in Architecture, the Environment, Agriculture, Medicine and Education. What must be challenged is "an attempt to impose an arrogant technology that seeks not to work with but to subdue Nature – what…is best described as the Industrialisation of Life. And, as part of this, there is a growing…disheartening inability to understand both the continuing centrality of that which is sacred, and the timeless importance of the traditional forms of understanding of our place in the world."
The Civilized SocietyThe website of The Prince of Wales, originally printed in "The Temenos Review"Prince of Wales, HRH Charles Art, Symbolism, Tradition, Modernism, Environment and Nature
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HRH Charles Prince of Wales’s Bibliography

Selected books authored or edited by H.R.H. The Prince of Wales


H.R.H. The Prince of Wales and Stephanie Donaldson. The Elements of Organic Gardening. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson Illustrated, 2007.

H.R.H. The Prince of Wales and Candida Lycett Green. The Garden at Highgrove. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2000.

Travels with the Prince: Paintings and Drawings Selected by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. [London]: Sheeran Lock, 1998.

Shakespeare, William. The Prince's Choice: A Personal Selection from Shakespeare by the Prince of Wales. Edited by H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. Hodder & Stoughton Ltd (November 2, 1995).

Islam and the West: a Lecture Given in the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford on 27 October 1993. Oxford, England: Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, 1993.

H.R.H. The Prince of Wales and Charles Clover. Highgrove: Portrait of an Estate. London: Chapmans, 1993.

The People’s Prince: a collection of major addresses. Published for the Australian Heritage Society by Veritas, 1992.

Watercolours. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. L ondon: Little, Brown, [1991].

An Exhibition of Watercolour Sketches by H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. London: Anna Hunter and Guy Thompson, c1990.

The Rainforest Lecture: given by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew on 6 February 1990. [London?]: Friends of the Earth Trust, [1990].

A Vision of Britain: A Personal View of Architecture. London: Doubleday, 1989.

Charles in his Own Words. Compiled by Rosemary York. London: W.H. Allen, 1981.

The Old Man of Lochnagar. London: Hamilton, 1980.


Online Resources about HRH Charles Prince of Wales

Almost every conceivable detail of The Prince's life and work can be found on The website of The Prince of Wales. The site includes links to many materials, including speeches and articles. Materials can also be found on the life and work of The Prince's wife and sons.
The Prince's videotaped Conference Introduction to the 2006 Sacred Web Conference ("Tradition in the Modern World") can be watched on the website of the Traditionalist journal Sacred Web. The comments are insightful and interesting, and show The Prince's understanding of the Perennial Philosophy and the harmful effects of rampant modernism. The videotaped remarks play through a Flash player, requiring this add-on to your web browser. (Most computers already have this.) A transcript of The Prince's presentation can be read by clicking on the second item in the "Writings Online" section of this web page.
HRH The Prince of Wales is the Patron of the Temenos Academy, an organization where "scholars and teachers [are] committed to what is known as 'the perennial philosophy'." The Academy's website includes a message by The Prince of Wales on the work of the Temenos Academy. The Temenos Academy Review is the journal of the Academy and is the successor to the journal Temenos, first published in 1981 and founded by Keith Critchlow, Brian Keeble, Kathleen Raine and Philip Sherrard. HRH The Prince of Wales wrote that the Academy and its review are “committed both to the perennial philosophy and to the notion that Man is, at root, a spiritual creature with spiritual and intellectual needs which have to be nourished if we are to fulfill our potential.”

Excerpts from HRH Charles Prince of Wales’s writing

The following is excerpted from the transcript of
HRM The Prince of Wales' address
to the 2006 Sacred Web Conference.
(Click here to read the full transcript.)

For me, the teachings of Tradition suggest the presence of a reality that can bring about a reality of integration, and it is this reality that can be contrasted with so much of Modernism’s obsession with dis-integration, dis-connection and de-construction – that which is sometimes termed the “malaise of modernity”. Cut off at the root from the Transcendent, Modernism has become deracinated and has separated itself – and thereby everything that comes within its thrall – from that which integrates; that which enables us to turn towards and reconnect with the Divine.

In this way, the loss of Tradition cuts to the very core of our being since it conditions that which we can “know” and “be”. For Modernism, by its unrelenting emphasis on the quantitative view of reality, limits and distorts the true nature of the Real and our perception of it. Whilst it has enabled us to know much that has been of material benefit, it also prevents us from knowing that which I would like to refer to as the knowledge of the Heart; that which enables us to be fully human.

This dilemma is captured in ancient notions of balance and harmony; notions that are, for example, expressed in many guises in that wonderful Kabbalistic diagram of the Tree of Life. As the Temenos Fellow, Warren Kenton, so beautifully explains in his lectures to the students of the Academy, the teaching of the Tree of Life is that the “active” and the “passive” aspects of life, which on their own may lead to imbalance and disharmony, must be, can only be, brought together in harmony by the influx into our lives of the Divine and the Sacred. Whether or not we interpret this image as an explanation of an outer or an inner orientation, it is in this way, and only in this way, that the forces, or characteristics, of expansion and constraint can be brought into balance.



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